My 2002 Ford Windstar is allowing me to bring the van back

The thing is the dealership I purchased my 2002 Ford Windstar is allowing me to bring the van back (working or not – since the alternator currently needs to be replaced) and forgive the whole loan as long as I purchase from them again. They think I will be finanacing, but in reality I will be purchasing “cash on hand”. My currently loan on the Ford is around $3000 so this is a great deal on that. The only thing is they have a limited choice. They have also have:

  • 2005 Chevrolet Cavalier
  • 2004 Chevrolet Impala
  • 2003 PT Cruiser
  • 2002 Nissan Maxima
  • 2000 Toyota Camry Solara
  • 2002 Nissan Xterra… I’m partial to Nissans because my 1st and last “new” car was a 1995 Nissan Maxima and it served me well until 2001 when my ex-husband bought it from me when I was relocating.

I’m also looking at:

  • 2003 Mitsubishi Montero sport
  • 2000 Chevy Tahoe
  • 2003 Chevy Trailblazer

My only experiences with Chevy’s are my parents 1988 Chevy Conversion van that survived over 200,000+ miles with nothing more than an alternator, and ex-husbands 1994 Chevy Blazer whose transmission dropped 4 years later.

So I have a lot of factors to look at:

– my family of 4 (2 girls 8-6 that do not want to be touching each other in the car)
– we have and will continue to take “road trips” to California and Kentucky starting from Texas each year (elderly family members to visit before its too late)
– descent gas mileage
– the possiblity of relocating to Germany or Japan with DH’s Army career (something that can survive the Autobaun)

I need a reliable vehicle that can handle all of this. So any new comments or information on this?

fordBEING german, i would suggest anything that has good gasmilage and weather you can find PARTS in germany or japan… which would be nissan, toyota or mitsubishi….

the japanese, as tight as they are with imports, would probably make it hard for you to get chevy parts, unless the military has an auto zone.

another thing to remember: should you move to germany, you would be hard pressed to afford gas for ANYTHINg, as their gas goes by the QUART!!!!! a gallon equivalent goes for something like over 6 EUROS!!!!! and the exchange rate makes it even higher. i think, just a few days ago, it took 1.48 US $$ to make 1 euro. anything that would requiere excessive gas would kill you over there. i think the military does have their own gas stations, but i am not familiar with their prices. parts and gasprices ought to be added to your calculations.

I just wanted to add that we have 3 Fords and they’re still running great. I have to admit I have an uncle who works for a Ford dealership, so we take our cars to him for maintenance, etc. But anyway, We have a 1997 Aerostar and it’s got about 160,000 + miles on it. We bought it used with 80,000 on it. That car will probably outlive us. It’s GREAT on mileage. My husband is in the Navy and that van has been back and forth between Utah and California MANY times over. Short, or long distance we LOVE that van!
I also have a 1995 Explorer that gets pretty good mileage as well. I think we’re up to about 172000 on that one. (I bought it from my dad 2 years ago.. he was the original owner) Still running great.

Then my dh has a 2001 Explorer Sport Track. We bought it used and it had a few problems at first. (I blame that on the slimy sales guy we bought it from) But since we’ve had it “fixed” it’s been great. The mileage isn’t as great as the other 2, but certainly not “bad” for an SUV/Truck.

Again, all of these vehicles have been between Utah and California without any problems.

I’m new here but here goes my project

I live in PA and won full legal and physical custody of my son almost two years ago.

Bragging a little but also a reminder that it can be done. I spent almost a year in the local law library and here’s what I learned (also known as “things your lawyer will not tell you”). Most states have laws that define when a child can select which parent to live with. Here in PA the age is 11 and it was established by the state supreme court in 2002. For many states the age is 13. We have a lot of state-specific laws regarding parenting and money-lending services. More info here.

Anyway, once your kids reach this age, it is a fairly straightforward process of having your child state for the record that he or she prefers to live with you and why. There were other circumstances but that was the basic argument.

Know the laws in your state. Most lawyers prosper from the anti-father attitudes so they won’t be of much help.

You’ll have to dig this up yourself.